Faculty Op-Ed: Political Inaction No Longer a Luxury

By Karla Hayashi

Political activism was probably not the reason why most of us earned our degrees and found our place here at one of the University of Hawai‘i campuses. We got here initially because of our passion for our academic discipline, desire to share that passion with students in the classroom, and opportunities to engage in research and other professional activities which we believed would benefit our students, campuses, community, and profession. Now more than ever, however, we also need to become politically engaged and active.

Most of us have been fortunate to carry out our work with relatively little disruption or chaos as a result of thoughtful and strategic decisions by UHPA’s Executive Director and Executive staff members. Yet now more than ever, political activism is required of us. Each new legislative session brings bills that can negatively impact our students who we work to educate, inform, and inspire to be and do better than when they first arrived on our respective campuses.

Some legislation has been in response to questionable decisions or actions by UH administrators. The impact of that legislation, however, can threaten the students and work we carry out in our individual classes and which could take years or decades to recover from, if ever. Recently deferred House Bill 555 is an example of this kind of legislation which, if passed, would have gutted the Languages and Literature of Europe and Americas department, among others. Eliminating so many language programs in one fell swoop would threaten the ability of many undergraduate students to obtain the required one or two languages needed to pursue graduate degrees. That bill, if passed and signed into law, might have reduced some of the financial challenges UH is facing, but at what long term cost to the undergraduate education of our students who choose to remain in-state for their higher education? What did they do to deserve this kind of legislation? Thankfully HB 555 was met by an organized group of students and educators who saw the danger of this bill and who moved in a coordinated way to voice their objections. HB 555 was deferred and hopefully is unlikely to be resuscitated this session.

The threat of legislation like HB 555, however, does not disappear at the end of this legislative session.

Bills like HB 555 and others are why it is vital now, more perhaps than ever, that we all become politically active in some way. This political activism can take many forms.

You can be politically active and engaged by regularly checking UHPA’s Legislative Action Center. This new feature on UHPA’s website identifies and summarizes the bills UHPA is tracking and can educate members about various issues we may not always be aware of within the isolation of our individual department and campus units.

You can also take a few minutes to contact your legislative representatives to let them know your thoughts about bills they introduced or which they may eventually vote on by submitting testimony.

You can consult with UHPA Executive staff to find out how you and other members can organize and carry out actions that help legislators and elected officials understand what we think about their efforts to address the numerous challenges facing the university. They need to hear our voices and be educated about how their legislation will impact our ability to educate students who we all hope will become engaged citizens making thoughtful evidence based decisions which will impact our community as well as future students who attend the University of Hawai‘i long after we leave our posts.

Sitting quietly on the side assuming someone else will do something or deliberately choosing not to engage in political discourse is no longer a luxury we have. Our students, their future, and our ability to educate them objectively and thoughtfully depends on your political activism.

Faculty Op-Ed: A Hard Knocks Education

By Robert Cooney, PhD

As a young research professor, working within a university research unit in which faculty were fairly judged by their accomplishments and potential, I could not understand why in the world faculty needed a union. After all, didn’t academics believe in truth and honor above all else? Why would one even need a contract in such circumstances? Over the last 30 years I have learned and discovered a lot concerning the role of vitamins in health, epidemiology of cancer, and the chemistry of tocopherols, but what stands out is my free and extensive continuing education relating to narcissism, greed, jealousy, sociopathy, and most recently, misogyny. This hard knocks education into personality disorders along with the passage of time has eroded my early perception that leaders and administrators base actions and decisions on fairness and what is best for the institution. Unfortunately individuals that lack moral integrity increasingly occupy positions of power, both within the university system and in our broader society, and the consequences can be devastating, particularly for those that are most vulnerable.

Although none of us like to perceive ourselves as “vulnerable”, especially when we are young, the reality is that students, staff, and untenured faculty are easy targets for exploitation, abuse, and mistreatment. Even tenure does not provide a guaranteed defense against the forces of darkness when they choose to attack. It usually is only at the point that one comes up against such an attack that one appreciates the value of having an employment contract and the strength of a cooperative organization behind you, such as UHPA. JN Musto one day made one of the best analogies I have ever heard to the UHPA Board of Directors that “UHPA was like health insurance, nobody likes paying for it but the day you need it, you are awfully glad you have it”. To further the analogy, health insurance cannot always save you from the ravages of an incurable disease such as pancreatic cancer, but there are many diseases that it can save you from and it certainly can help save your family from economic ruin as you fight the disease. As many without the benefits of union representation have learned, the cost and emotional strain of fighting for justice, finding the right lawyer, and taking the fight to a large and uncaring institution while collecting unemployment can be too much for most to handle and, indeed, many give up the fight early on because of the enormity of the battle.

While UHPA is often constrained by the limits of labor law and our contract, as an organization it has not been limited by lack of expertise or desire to fight on behalf of its constituents. On balance I have personally observed many success stories where UHPA has gone to bat for the rights of faculty and perhaps of greater importance is the deterrent effect that UHPA has on egregious behavior of administrators. At least the more enlightened administrators soon learn that behaving properly is better than taking on UHPA. Alas, as a researcher in the field of cancer prevention, I clearly understand the frustration that comes with preventing a problem – there are no grateful patients at the end of the road! The problems that a well-negotiated contract and a reputation for success save us from every day may never fully reveal themselves to our consciousness, however, it behooves us to consider once in a while what life might be like in a world in which there was no counterbalance to power in the workplace. I know that without UHPA I would not be where I am today. Now If only my health insurance only cost 1% of my salary!

FacFAQs: Will the snap-back be included in my “high three”?

Pearla has served many years as 9-month faculty at Lili’uokalani Community College, and is looking forward to her retirement in Spring 2015! After much congratulations and many joyful tears from colleagues, she started thinking about the financial repercussions of the snap-back. She knows that ERS often doesn’t include retroactive payments so as not to inflate one’s AFC. Will the snap-back be included in her “high three”?

Answer:

Although Pearla’s “retirement estimate” does not reflect it, and it is not common practice from ERS, the snap-back payments are the exception that proves the rule! Because the lump sum falls within Pearla’s “high three,” she can rest easy that the lump sum will definitely be included in the ERS’s calculation of her actual AFC.

FacFAQs

Ken Tanaka* works for DaBest Community College as an Assistant Professor. After skimming through “Salaries” section of the ratified Tentative Agreement slated to begin on July 1, 2015, Ken is upset. Having been hired in 1994, Ken was only able to negotiate the minimum salary, and currently makes $60,000 a year. Now the new hire his department receives next year will be entitled to Ken’s current salary as a base rate of pay! With all the service Ken has put in, how is this equitable? Why didn’t the union negotiate a base salary increase instead of percentages?

 

Answer:
After analyzing the financial and political conditions the University system faces, UHPA strategized that the only way to ensure across-the-board increases was to raise salaries by percent and increase minimum salaries by rank. Unlike the Department of Education, UH system salaries have never been predicated on years of service; the salary system has always been based on a meritocracy of ranks. Whereas actions to resolve compression issues can always be sought by the deserving individual, what this TA aimed to resolve was the more-difficult-to-achieve adjustment for the salary differential between 9- and 11-month appointments.
The good news is that Ken can take action to increase his pay! The new TA maintained the existing contractual provisions that allow for special salary adjustments based on merit, retention, and equity from the current contract’s section R-18, Memorandum of Understanding on the Procedures for Special Salary Adjustments and Bonus Payments. He can apply at any time for a special salary increase using supporting data from UHPA’s Salary Research.
* Any resemblance to real persons, living or dead, is purely coincidental.