UHPA Endorsement of Mazie Hirono

While many in Congress are attempting to limit the federal government’s support of public higher education, Mazie Hirono believes there is a strong role for the federal government. The federal government, in collaboration with universities, colleges and businesses, can create a strong university system that will enable students to be successful in school and in life.  A strong university system is an economic engine for our state as it can attract the best and the brightest and create good paying jobs, she said.

She recognizes that support for higher education, however, cannot be done in vacuum. Support for the economy and job creation ultimately provides the resources for the federal government to allocate to Hawaii and other states to support public higher education.  This is also why Mazie Hirono supports President Obama’s initiatives on tax reform, clean energy, and investment in bridges, highways, airports, and schools, as they are all designed to stimulate the economy. 

College affordability is both a local and national issue. The federal government currently supports students in the University of Hawaii system in myriad ways in this area and many may not be aware of it. 

This support includes Pell grants, Stafford loans, and work-study programs, all of which bring in millions of dollars in federal support to help students who are enrolled in the University of Hawaii system. Mazie Hirono has supported the expansion of Pell grants, limitation of the percentage of loan payments in wages, tuition loan forgiveness for students who pursue certain careers such early childhood education, and tax credits for tuition.

In addition, federal bonds for infrastructure support and construction have been made available to the UH to retrofit or replace existing buildings.

Quarterly Medicare Part B Premium Reimbursement

Retirees’ Medicare Part B 9/30/12 quarterly reimbursement will be deposited into retirees’ financial institutions on Monday, October 1, 2012 instead of Friday, September 28, 2012.

Sign Waving Schedule for Mazie Hirono

Hawaii Victory 2012 Sign Waving Schedule

Mondays:

  • Downtown: Channel Street & Ala Moana Blvd. (7:45 – 8:45 a.m.)
  • East Honolulu/Hawaii Kai: Kalanianaole Highway, one block Koko Head, past Kalani High School near Waiholo Street (4:30 – 6:00 p.m.)

Tuesdays:

  • Nimitz Highway: Meet at HQ – 1130 N. Nimitz Hwy. (4:30 – 6:00 p.m.)

Wednesdays:

  • Mililani: Corner of Meheula & Kuahelani on Sept. 26th (4:00 – 5:30 p.m.)
  • Ewa, Fort Weaver Road: In front of the old Hawaii Medical Center in Ewa (4:30 – 6:00 p.m.)
  • Kaneohe: Corner of Likelike Hwy/Kamehameha Hwy. (4:30 – 6:00 p.m.)

Thursdays:

  • Kalihi, Seafarers Wave: Dillingham Blvd. & Kalihi Street (12 noon – 1:00 p.m.)
  • Palama, Laborers Wave: Palama & Vineyard (4:30 – 5:30 p.m.)
  • Pearl City: Grassy area by “E Komo Mai” sign, right off of exit 10 (4:30 – 5:30 p.m.)

Fridays: (Starting October 12)

  • Kailua/Castle Junction: Intersection of Kalanianaole Highway and Kailua Road in front of Castle Medical Center (4:30 – 6:00 p.m.)

 

For more information or to sign up call 536-3292 or email corie@hawaiidemocrats.com

Social Security Questions

TOPIC:            “Social Security Questions”

DATE:                Wednesday,
September 12th and
                         Wednesday,
October 10, 2012 (Please note date change)

TIME:                6:00
p.m.

LOCATION:       Manoa
Campus – Campus Center Room 309A

PRESENTER:     Brandon
E. Wallis, CRPS, Financial Advisor
                        (“Edward
Jones”/373-9977)

 View Flyer

Comment: UHPA wishes to inform members of above referenced
opportunities.  The purpose of this announced
seminar-series is consistent with the hope that members will achieve personal
financial goals for themselves and their families.  This Financial Advisor has provided evidence
that these seminars do conform with FINRA guidelines.   A Broker Check through FINRA indicates the
securities broker qualifications are current. 
The Union does not provide any financial assistance for this educational
offering besides this notice.

Workers Coming Out Day Forum on Kaua’i – October 4, 2012

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:  September 20, 2012

Being Out At Work on Kaua‘i: A Community Forum

Thursday, October 4, 5:30-8:00 p.m.

War Memorial Convention Center (4191 Hardy St.) in Lihue

FREE and open to the public

 

Contacts:

Steve Dinion
808-543-6054
prideatworkhi@gmail.com

Noelle Campbeilh
808-634-0127
pflagkauai@gmail.com

www.prideatworkhawaii.org

 

Heavy pupus will be served beginning at 5:30 pm and drinks will be provided.  The program will be starting at 6:00 p.m.  It will feature a showing of the documentary, “Out At Work,” followed by a panel discussion with local LGBT workers.

 

About the documentary “Out at Work”

In 1992 Cheryl Summerville, a cook at a Cracker Barrel restaurant outside Atlanta, received a termination paper stating that she was fired for “failing to demonstrate normal heterosexual values.” She was shocked to discover that in most of the US it is legal to fire workers simply because of their sexual orientation.  OUT AT WORK chronicles the stories of a cook, an auto worker and a librarian as they seek workplace safety, job security and benefits for LGBT workers.

Robert Hawk of the Sundance Film Festival noted: “Filled with humor, insight and moving fervor, OUT AT WORK offers a stirring experience for all of us.”  Scott Sloan of the Shepherd Express said: “OUT AT WORK is a well-researched, well-made documentary about gay life in the workplace. Its informative look at “routine” discrimination and harassment – including and out-and-out threats against gay workers – is an eye-opener for those who thought that everybody knew better in the 90s.”

Panel Discussion

Following the showing of the documentary, there will be a panel discussion including local LGBT working people followed by a group discussion.  The panelists will share stories of their experiences – positive and negative – being “out” at work, and how they have coped, found allies, and made important changes in their workplaces and unions.  The panelists represent a wide variety of LGBT working people, union and non-union, public and private sector, from white collar, blue collar, and service industry workplaces.

The Impact of Discrimination on LGBT workers

With the passage of legislation creating civil unions in Hawai‘i, and the signing of a law clarifying that employment discrimination on the basis of gender identity and expression is illegal in the State, lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) workers in Hawai‘i have achieved important steps toward equality. 

However, LGBT working people continue to suffer the effects of homophobia and transphobia here and across the US.   For example, a July 2011 study by the Williams Institute of the UCLA School of Law found:

  • 27% of Lesbian, Gay and Bisexual (LGB) people had experienced at least one form of sexual orientation-based discrimination, 27% had experienced workplace harassment and 7% had lost a job;
  • Among LGB people who are open about their sexual orientation in the workplace, 38% experienced at least one form of discrimination during the five years prior to being surveyed;
  • Not surprisingly, more than one-third of LGB respondents to the survey reported that they were not out to anyone at work, and only 25% were out to all of their co-workers;
  • Discrimination and fear of discrimination can have negative effects on LGBT employees in terms of wages, job opportunities, mental and physical health, productivity, and job satisfaction;
  • Studies consistently show that gay men and lesbians earn significantly less than their heterosexual counterparts;
  • Other studies show that discrimination, fear of discrimination, and concealing one’s LGBT identity can negatively impact the well-being of LGBT employees, including their mental and physical health, productivity in the workplace, and job satisfaction.

A major study of Transgender people published in February 2011 by the
National Center for Transgender Equality and the National Gay and
Lesbian Task Force showed disturbingly overwhelming levels of
discrimination on the basis of gender identity and/or gender expression:

  • Transgender survey respondents experienced unemployment at twice the rate of the general population, with rates for people of color up to four times the national unemployment rate;
  • Ninety percent (90%) of those surveyed reported experiencing harassment, mistreatment or discrimination on the job or took actions like hiding who they are to avoid it;
  • Forty-seven percent (47%) said they had experienced an adverse job outcome, such as being fired, not hired or denied a promotion because of being transgender or gender non-conforming;
  • Over one-quarter (26%) reported that they had lost a job due to being transgender or gender non-conforming and 50% were harassed;
  • Large majorities attempted to avoid discrimination by hiding their gender or gender transition (71%) or delaying their gender transition (57%);
  • The vast majority (78%) of those who transitioned from one gender to the other reported that they felt more comfortable at work and their job performance improved, despite high levels of mistreatment.
  • Recent attacks on the most basic rights of workers to collectively bargain put at risk many gains LGBT workers have made through their union contracts, including domestic partnership health coverage and family leave, mandated anti-discrimination and anti-harassment policies, and transgender health care. 

 

About National Coming Out Day

Since 1988, October 11 – the anniversary of the historic 1987 March On Washington for Lesbian and Gay Rights – has been celebrated by lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people and allies as National Coming Out Day (NCOD) in the US.  Its purpose is to celebrate the process of “coming out” – openly declaring and affirming one’s sexual orientation and/or gender identity – to one’s family, community, and/or coworkers.  While for too many, coming out remains frightening, risky or even dangerous, it can also be an affirmative and liberating experience, both for those coming out and those who care about them.

NCOD also serves to raise awareness of the presence of LGBT people in every part of society and in most every family, as well as of issues of discrimination and exclusion that LGBT people face.

#########################

prideatworkhawaii@hawaiiantel.net

Like us on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/pages/Pride-At-Work-Hawaii-LGBT-workers-and-allies-out-and-organizing/301859223201480
P.O. Box 22416
Honolulu, Hawai’i 96822-2416
(808) 543-6054

Pride At Work Hawai’i advocates for full equality for LGBITQ workers in their workplaces and their unions, and works to build mutual support between the labor movement and the LGBITQ community.  Pride At Work Hawai’i (an affiliate of the Hawai’i State AFL-CIO) is a chapter of Pride At Work (www.prideatwork.org), a constituency group of the AFL-CIO.

Workers Coming Out Day Forum on Kaua’i – October 4, 2012

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:  September 20, 2012

Being Out At Work on Kaua‘i: A Community Forum

Thursday, October 4, 5:30-8:00 p.m.

War Memorial Convention Center (4191 Hardy St.) in Lihue

FREE and open to the public

 

Contacts:

Steve Dinion
808-543-6054
prideatworkhi@gmail.com

Noelle Campbeilh
808-634-0127
pflagkauai@gmail.com

www.prideatworkhawaii.org

 

Heavy pupus will be served beginning at 5:30 pm and drinks will be provided.  The program will be starting at 6:00 p.m.  It will feature a showing of the documentary, “Out At Work,” followed by a panel discussion with local LGBT workers.

 

About the documentary “Out at Work”

In 1992 Cheryl Summerville, a cook at a Cracker Barrel restaurant outside Atlanta, received a termination paper stating that she was fired for “failing to demonstrate normal heterosexual values.” She was shocked to discover that in most of the US it is legal to fire workers simply because of their sexual orientation.  OUT AT WORK chronicles the stories of a cook, an auto worker and a librarian as they seek workplace safety, job security and benefits for LGBT workers.

Robert Hawk of the Sundance Film Festival noted: “Filled with humor, insight and moving fervor, OUT AT WORK offers a stirring experience for all of us.”  Scott Sloan of the Shepherd Express said: “OUT AT WORK is a well-researched, well-made documentary about gay life in the workplace. Its informative look at “routine” discrimination and harassment – including and out-and-out threats against gay workers – is an eye-opener for those who thought that everybody knew better in the 90s.”

Panel Discussion

Following the showing of the documentary, there will be a panel discussion including local LGBT working people followed by a group discussion.  The panelists will share stories of their experiences – positive and negative – being “out” at work, and how they have coped, found allies, and made important changes in their workplaces and unions.  The panelists represent a wide variety of LGBT working people, union and non-union, public and private sector, from white collar, blue collar, and service industry workplaces.

The Impact of Discrimination on LGBT workers

With the passage of legislation creating civil unions in Hawai‘i, and the signing of a law clarifying that employment discrimination on the basis of gender identity and expression is illegal in the State, lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) workers in Hawai‘i have achieved important steps toward equality. 

However, LGBT working people continue to suffer the effects of homophobia and transphobia here and across the US.   For example, a July 2011 study by the Williams Institute of the UCLA School of Law found:

  • 27% of Lesbian, Gay and Bisexual (LGB) people had experienced at least one form of sexual orientation-based discrimination, 27% had experienced workplace harassment and 7% had lost a job;
  • Among LGB people who are open about their sexual orientation in the workplace, 38% experienced at least one form of discrimination during the five years prior to being surveyed;
  • Not surprisingly, more than one-third of LGB respondents to the survey reported that they were not out to anyone at work, and only 25% were out to all of their co-workers;
  • Discrimination and fear of discrimination can have negative effects on LGBT employees in terms of wages, job opportunities, mental and physical health, productivity, and job satisfaction;
  • Studies consistently show that gay men and lesbians earn significantly less than their heterosexual counterparts;
  • Other studies show that discrimination, fear of discrimination, and concealing one’s LGBT identity can negatively impact the well-being of LGBT employees, including their mental and physical health, productivity in the workplace, and job satisfaction.

A major study of Transgender people published in February 2011 by the
National Center for Transgender Equality and the National Gay and
Lesbian Task Force showed disturbingly overwhelming levels of
discrimination on the basis of gender identity and/or gender expression:

  • Transgender survey respondents experienced unemployment at twice the rate of the general population, with rates for people of color up to four times the national unemployment rate;
  • Ninety percent (90%) of those surveyed reported experiencing harassment, mistreatment or discrimination on the job or took actions like hiding who they are to avoid it;
  • Forty-seven percent (47%) said they had experienced an adverse job outcome, such as being fired, not hired or denied a promotion because of being transgender or gender non-conforming;
  • Over one-quarter (26%) reported that they had lost a job due to being transgender or gender non-conforming and 50% were harassed;
  • Large majorities attempted to avoid discrimination by hiding their gender or gender transition (71%) or delaying their gender transition (57%);
  • The vast majority (78%) of those who transitioned from one gender to the other reported that they felt more comfortable at work and their job performance improved, despite high levels of mistreatment.
  • Recent attacks on the most basic rights of workers to collectively bargain put at risk many gains LGBT workers have made through their union contracts, including domestic partnership health coverage and family leave, mandated anti-discrimination and anti-harassment policies, and transgender health care. 

 

About National Coming Out Day

Since 1988, October 11 – the anniversary of the historic 1987 March On Washington for Lesbian and Gay Rights – has been celebrated by lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people and allies as National Coming Out Day (NCOD) in the US.  Its purpose is to celebrate the process of “coming out” – openly declaring and affirming one’s sexual orientation and/or gender identity – to one’s family, community, and/or coworkers.  While for too many, coming out remains frightening, risky or even dangerous, it can also be an affirmative and liberating experience, both for those coming out and those who care about them.

NCOD also serves to raise awareness of the presence of LGBT people in every part of society and in most every family, as well as of issues of discrimination and exclusion that LGBT people face.

#########################

prideatworkhawaii@hawaiiantel.net

Like us on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/pages/Pride-At-Work-Hawaii-LGBT-workers-and-allies-out-and-organizing/301859223201480
P.O. Box 22416
Honolulu, Hawai’i 96822-2416
(808) 543-6054

Pride At Work Hawai’i advocates for full equality for LGBITQ workers in their workplaces and their unions, and works to build mutual support between the labor movement and the LGBITQ community.  Pride At Work Hawai’i (an affiliate of the Hawai’i State AFL-CIO) is a chapter of Pride At Work (www.prideatwork.org), a constituency group of the AFL-CIO.

Workers Coming Out Day Forum on Kaua’i – October 4, 2012

Faculty Input Needed to be Submitted to Senate Committee on UH Accountability

THE SENATE

THE TWENTY-SIXTH LEGISLATURE

INTERIM OF 2012

 

SENATE SPECIAL COMMITTEE ON ACCOUNTABILITY

Senator Donna Mercado Kim, Chair

Senator Jill N. Tokuda, Vice Chair

Senator Les Ihara, Jr.

Senator Sam Slom

Senator Ronald D. Kouchi     

 
NOTICE OF INFORMATIONAL BRIEFING
 
DATE:    Monday, September 24, 2012
TIME:     1:00 p.m.
PLACE:  Conference Room 211, State Capitol, 415 S. Beretania St.
 

A G E N D A

The purpose of this briefing is to review the oversight, accountability, and transparency of the operational and financial management of the University of Hawaii System, including but not limited to the University of Manoa Athletics Department
 
Only written testimony will be accepted.

In Person: Deliver to Committee Clerk in room 210, State Capitol

E-Mail: Submit testimony to SCATestimony@capitol.hawaii.gov
(10mb limit)

Fax: 808-587-7205 or fax 1-800-586-6659 (toll free for outside Oahu); 5 page limit

If you require special assistance or auxiliary aids and/or services to participate in the informational briefing (i.e., sign language interpreter or wheelchair accessibility), please contact the Committee Clerk at (808) 587-7200 to make a request for arrangements at least 24 hours prior to the briefing.  Prompt requests help to ensure the availability of qualified individuals and appropriate accommodations.
 
For further information, please call the Committee Clerk at (808)587-7200.